Tag Archives: James P. “Pat” Howle

April edition of South Carolina Living online NOW

The April 2017 edition of South Carolina Living magazine will be delivered to mailboxes of subscribing members mid-month. Horry Electric’s local content, as well as the main part of the magazine, are both available online NOW!

Highlights include:HORRYAPRILCOVER

  • CEO Column:  Find out what you’re missing at the Annual Meeting
  • Annual Meeting Map of Registration and Voting locations at Coastal Carolina
  • Beat the Peak!  Sign up today and Get the Message!
  • Rural Lady of the Year Feature: Janell Lewis becomes 39th Rural Lady of the Year
  • After-hours and weekends, we’re still ‘on call’ Horry Electric’s System Control is on duty, 24/7/365.
  • Co-op returning $3.3 million in capital credits to members

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November/December edition of South Carolina Living is available online!

The November/December 2015 edition of South Carolina Living magazine will be delivered to mailboxes mid-month, but  Horry Electric’s local page content and the online version of the magazine are available NOW!

Horry Electric highlights include:Horry 11-15 cx3_Page_3

  • CEO Column: This holiday season, remember your co-op cares, plus Safety Tips for Christmas
  • Horry News: Recap of the flooding in SC; lessons from the storm; Notify HEC if you have Special Medical Needs; Your phone number is a vital connection to PowerTouch, our outage reporting system, plus Could You Use a Shopping Assistant for the holidays?
  • Merry Christmas from Horry Electric Cooperative – includes the office schedule for Thanksgiving, Christmas and the New Year.
  • Horry Electric History feature
  • How to Become a Trustee of Horry Electric Cooperative
  • 2016 Annual Meeting Timeline

Here for the long haul: National network a big benefit

James P. “Pat” Howle, CEO, column from the July 2015 edition of South Carolina Living magazine.

Horry logo stack new_cmykadjusted

Touchstone Energy Cooperatives® is the nationwide branding alliance created especially for and adopted by electric cooperatives in the late 90s. It is a unifying symbol of our common four core values; innovation, accountability, integrity and commitment to community.

When your co-op joined the ranks of the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives® nationwide branding alliance on Jan. 1, 1998, we were one of 300 participating electric cooperatives in 32 states delivering energy and energy solutions to more than 16 million members every day.

Today, there are 751 electric cooperatives in 46 states participating in the network collectively delivering on the commitments of integrity, accountability, innovation and commitment to community to 32 million members.

Our history is our future
The Horry Electric name, with Willie Wiredhand right in the center, is one of the most easily recognized symbol of your electric co-op in our community. Willie was the unifying symbol of all the electric cooperatives in the U.S.A. for a number of years. He was the 'spokesplug' for the national network of electric cooperatives

The Horry Electric name, with Willie Wiredhand right in the center, is one of the most easily recognized symbols of your electric co-op in our community. Willie was the unifying symbol of all the electric cooperatives in the U.S.A. for a number of years. He was the ‘spokesplug’ for the national network of electric cooperatives. He officially retired from the national network several years ago, but you still see him around some co-ops – including Horry Electric.

Horry Electric will be celebrating 75 years of service in January. Organized for and by people right here in Horry County, our co-op is deeply rooted in the community. Like all cooperative businesses, we operate according to the core principles and values first set out in 1844 by the Rochdale Society of Equitable Pioneers in England.

Members are directly impacted by at least five of the seven principles. Voluntary and open membership, democratic member control and member’s economic participation truly set us apart from other types of businesses. In everything we do, maintaining the cooperative’s autonomy and independence, as well as having a concern for the community by working for sustainable development are among the priorities set by the management team of your Cooperative and by the members of your board of trustees.

Alliance makes us stronger

The alliance with sister cooperatives and the addition of the Touchstone Energy brand to our existing local, well established presence in 1998 is an excellent example of cooperation among cooperatives, which is another guiding principle. From our history, we know we are much more effective with accomplishing goals by working together with sister cooperatives on a regional and national basis. Improved efficiency and cost effectiveness are other benefits of working together.

TWS_Logo_TSE_stackedBeing a part of the Touchstone Energy Cooperative network is a big benefit to our co-op, our members and our communities. It enhances our local connections and has given us the ability to follow through on another very important guiding principle— education, training and information. The list of resources and tools available through Touchstone Energy is long. You can learn more by visiting us online at HorryElectric.com and TogetherWeSave.com.

Horry Electric Cooperative is here for the long haul. You can count on us to look out for you and be your advocate. It matters to us, because we work and live here, too. The majority of us are members ourselves. What impacts you, also impacts us.

Stay tuned as we gear up to celebrate 75 years in Horry County and 18 years as a Touchstone Energy Cooperative.

April edition of South Carolina Living available online

Thorryaprilcoverhe April 2015 edition of South Carolina Living magazine will be delivered to the mailboxes of members and subscribers mid-month, but you can view our local content online now!

 HEC local highlights include:

  • CEO Column  It’s that time of year – Annual Meeting 2015 is next month
  • 37th Rural Lady of the Year:  Frances Strickland
  • 2015 Annual Meeting parking/registration location diagram
  • Co-op Connections Card program feature:  Waccamaw River Rentals
  • Green Power – Meet the stars of Team Green
  • Capital Credits – Co-op returning $2.6 million in capital credits to members

South Carolina Living for February 2015 packed with news and information

febsclcoverThe February 2015 edition of South Carolina Living magazine will  be delivered to the mailboxes of members and subscribers mid-month,  but you can view it online NOW!

HEC local highlights include:

  • CEO Column  Always call before you dig: Projects big or small; make sure you call
  • Operation Round Up Report: HEC members generously helped 208 neighbors in need with $54,000 in aid during 2014
  • WIRE Jenny Ballard Opportunity Scholarship deadline is June 1
  • In Burgess, memories of another time – Mules and oxen helped bring co-op power to the Freewoods, member says
  • She ‘loved everything on the farm’ – except for one thing – Annie Plowden remembers growing up on her family’s farm in Burgess’ Freewoods
  • Right back where he started He followed opportunity up North, then followed his instincts back to Burgess – and farming – featuring Cad Holmes. 

January 2015 edition of South Carolina Living packed with news and information

januarycoverscl2015The January 2015 edition of South Carolina Living magazine will soon be delivered to the mailboxes of members and subscribers,  but you can view it online NOW!

Horry Electric Cooperative local content includes :

  • CEO Column  – Resolve to modify energy use
  • Two opportunities for high school students! Juniors may apply for Youth Tour 2015 (deadline 2/27) and Seniors may apply for the $1500 WIRE scholarship (deadline 3/1)!
  • Co-op Connections® Feature: Heating and air and savings to spare, just for co-op members!
  • Hooray for Hollywood! A touch of Tinseltown in Tabor City helped their teen romance take root in Green Sea
  • Authors share an easy-flowing tale of two rivers –

Other January 2015 highlights available online:

Join the Co-op Month celebration

ICoopMonth-280n October, members from more than 29,000 cooperatives nationwide will join to celebrate the advantages of cooperative membership and recognize the benefits and values co-ops bring to their members and communities.

Unlike other businesses, cooperatives are not-for-profit, democratically controlled, volunteer-run, member-owned organizations. They exist to serve their members, and that level of service remains high even during even the toughest times. Instead of issuing stock or paying dividends to outside shareholders, cooperatives provide value to their members through their level of customer services and membership checks at the end of each year.

As a cooperative, we are guided by seven principles. Originally drawn up by Charles Howarth, one of 28 weavers and other artisans who founded the Rochdale Society of Equitable Pioneers in Rochdale, England, on December 21, 1844, these principles governing cooperative operations were introduced into the United States in 1874 by the National Grange, and formally written down by the International Cooperative Alliance in 1937.

  1. Open and Voluntary MembershipCo-op_Month_Logo_f280x119_1380725114
  2. Democratic Member Control
  3. Members’ Economic Participation
  4. Autonomy and Independence
  5. Education, Training and Information
  6. Cooperation Among Cooperatives
  7. Concern For Community

These principles are underpinned by six ideals—the d cooperative values of Self-Help, Self-Responsibility, Democracy, Equality, Equity, and Solidarity. In addition, the International Cooperative Alliance lists cooperative “ethical values” of Honesty, Openness, Social Responsibility, and Caring for Others.